Adverb Phrases

A prepositional phrase can also be an adverb phrase, functioning as an adverb, as in the following sentences.

She bought some spinach when she went to the corner store.
Verb             Adverb

In this sentence, the prepositional phrase “to the corner store” acts as an adverb modifying the verb “went.”

Lightning flashed brightly in the night sky.
Verb                            Adverb

In this sentence, the prepositional phrase “in the night sky” functions as a adverb modifying the verb “flashed.”

We will meet at the library at 3:30 P.M.
Verb                                     Adverb

In this sentence, the prepositional phrase “at 3:30 P.M.” acts as an adverb modifying the verb phrase “will meet.”

February 8, 2010. Uncategorized. Leave a comment.

Adverb (-ly)

Many adverbs can be formed by adding –ly to adjectives:
– Beautifully
– Secretly
– Happily
– Openly
– Clearly
– Wisely
– Slowly
– Quickly
– Strongly
– Honestly
– Carefully
– Etc

Example:
– Lucky is a quick runner.
– Lucky runs quickly.
– The teacher explains clearly.
– He walks slowly.

Some adverbs are identical to adjectives in form. Others are completely different.
Please read and understand carefully!

Lucky is a fast runner. (Adjective)
Lucky runs fast. (Adverb) Lukman is a smart student. (Adjective)
Lukman studies hard. (Adverb)

Note:
Be careful with words like hardly and lately, which have no relation to the adjectives/adverbs hard and late.

Reference:
– Frank, Marcella, Modern English Exercises for non-native Speakers, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1972.
– Frank, Marcella, Modern English; A Practice Reference Guide, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall

February 8, 2010. Uncategorized. Leave a comment.

Adverbs

An adverb is a word that tells us more about a verb. An adverb “qualifies” or “modifies” a verb (The man ran quickly). But adverbs can also modify adjectives (Tara is really beautiful), or even other adverbs (It works very well).
Many different kinds of word are called adverbs. We can usually recognize an adverb by its:
1. Function (Job)
2. Form
3. Position

1. Function
The principal job of an adverb is to modify (give more information about) verbs, adjectives and other adverbs. In the following examples, the adverb is in bold and the word that it modifies is in italics.
 Modify a verb:
– Awi speaks loudly.
– Lukman lives locally.
– She never smokes.

 Modify an adjective:
– Rinto is really handsome.
– Bella is so kind.
– It is very hot today.

 Modify another adverb:
– My sister drives incredibly slowly.

2. Form
Many adverbs end in -ly. We form such adverbs by adding -ly to the adjective. Here are some examples:
– quickly, softly, strongly
– slowly, honestly, interestingly

But not all words that end in -ly are adverbs. “Friendly”, for example, is an adjective. Some adverbs have no particular form, for example:
– well, fast, hard, very, never, always, often, still.

3. Position
Adverbs have three main positions in the sentence:
 Front (before the subject):
– Now I shall study adverbs.

 Middle (between the subject and the main verb):
– I often study adverbs.
– We always get up at five o’clock.

 End (after the verb or object):
– We drives the car carefully.
– I do the job well.
– Ali will study hard.

Reference:
– Frank, Marcella, Modern English Exercises for non-native Speakers, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1972.
– Frank, Marcella, Modern English; A Practice Reference Guide, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall
– Echols, John M., Shadily, Hassan, An English – Indonesian Dictionary, Cet. XXIV, Jakarta: Gramedia, 1976.
– Swan, Michael, Practical English Usage, New Edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995.

February 3, 2010. Uncategorized. Leave a comment.

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February 3, 2010. Uncategorized. 1 comment.

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